Filtered by Author: Jim Kring

Rapid Development of Intuitive LabVIEW-Based Software for a Touch Screen Medical Device

Profusa is a start-up company made up of talented scientists and engineers working to develop a new generation of biosensors to monitor our body’s unique chemistry in an unprecedented way. At Profusa, their goal is to help physicians salvage limbs of patients suffering from critical limb ischemia by providing them with a new way to continuously measure tissue oxygen before, during, and after surgical treatments. Having already developed a lab prototype using LabVIEW, Profusa teamed up with us to help develop intuitive LabVIEW-based software for their Touch Screen Medical Device. Objective: To develop an easy-to-use, commercial-grade touch screen software interface using NI LabVIEW

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#5 Best Practice for using the JKI State Machine: Left-justify State Strings

In my last post on JKI State Machine Best Practices, I explained the #4 Best Practice: Use macros (instead of “chaining” together sequential states). In this post, I’ll talk about a very simple (yet important) best practice that will help make your code much more readable for you and others who work on or inherit your code. The #5 Best Practice: Left-justify State Strings I said this one was simple, right? Left-justified text — easy to read. Right-justified text — hard to read. With left-justification, as you can hopefully see, it’s much easier to read the category headings/groupings for multi-line (multi-state)

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JKI’s Highlights From NIWeek 2015

Wow! What a fantastic NIWeek. It may be over but our team at JKI is still reeling from the flurry of information and innovation jam-packed into an amazing week in Austin. From new NI embedded product lines to the launch of LabVIEW 2015 (which promises to help developer “write code faster; write faster code”) to technical sessions, social events, and inspiring keynotes. Here are some of our favorite moments and take-aways from NIWeek 2015: JKI Won two NI Engineering Impact Awards! We shared two NI Engineering Impact Awards with our customer Primus Power, first in the Energy category award and then

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EasyXML Source Code on GitHub (BSD Open Source License)

We are happy to announce that the JKI EasyXML Toolkit for LabVIEW has been released under an the BSD open source license on GitHub, here: https://github.com/JKISoftware/JKI-EasyXML Currently, only the source code is on GitHub and we haven’t released the built package yet. That’s coming, since there are some performance and other improvements we’re working on. If you’re interested in contributing, please Contact JKI.

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New Training Course: JKI State Machine for LabVIEW

I’m excited to announce that JKI is now offering a hands-on training course on how to use the JKI State Machine (an easy-to-use yet powerful state machine template that’s made freely available to the LabVIEW community). It is the very same template that is used by the JKI team, nearly every day, and is the result of years of refinement by our team of LabVIEW™ experts. This course is for anyone with a basic proficiency in LabVIEW who wants to create applications faster and write good, clean code (we’ll even send you home with some valuable project templates available exclusively to students

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Grid-Scale Energy Storage Powered by LabVIEW

Learn how LabVIEW helps prepare DNA samples for sequencing...

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At JKI, we are on a mission…

At JKI, our team has spent a great deal of time over the years thinking about what it is we do, for whom, and why. Now, I’m proud to publicly announce JKI’s official mission statement! Our mission has, naturally, permeated all of our work and resulted in a lot of happy customers who call us back over many years. This mission has also resulted in many significant technical contributions to both the high-tech industry and the state-of-the-art in LabVIEW. More about our mission JKI is located in the San Francisco Bay Area and serves start-ups and advanced R&D groups within high-tech companies in Silicon Valley and beyond. Fast-moving technology companies hire JKI to

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CLA Summit 2013 Europe: “Public Events for Modules” Video & Slides Now Available

I had the pleasure of being invited to speak at the CLA Summit Europe 2013, at NI France in Nanterre (just outside Paris).  This was a fantastic event and it was a lot of fun to meet CLAs from around the world (and especially Europe) and learn from them about this year’s theme: Interprocess Communication.  The food was also terrific — I’m just sayin’ 🙂 My talk, titled “Public Events for Modules,” was about a technique for Interprocess Communication in LabVIEW using Dynamic User Events as a core aspect of one’s software “modules” (classes, libraries, components, or whatever modular programming style

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#4 Best Practice for using the JKI State Machine: Use macros instead of “chaining” together sequential states

In my last post on JKI State Machine Best Practices, I explained the #3 Best Practice: Keep the Original Size (i.e. don’t grow the structures).  In this post, I’ll tell you which best practice came in fourth place. The #4 Best Practice: Use macros instead of “chaining” together sequential states Here’s what we mean: A “Macro” is a state that simply builds up a list of other states; calling the macro is like calling all the other states in the list. Note: There’s no actual work done in a “Macro” frame/state of the Case Structure. We simply add a sequence of states to the front

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#3 Best Practice for using the JKI State Machine: Keep the Original Size (i.e. don’t grow the structures)

In my last post on JKI State Machine Best Practices, I explained the #2 Best Practice: Don’t add code and logic inside the Event Structure.  In this post, I’ll tell you which best practice came in third place. The #3 Best Practice: Keep the Original Size (i.e. don’t grow the structures) Here’s what we mean: The size of the JKI State Machine was carefully designed to fit on one “reasonably sized” VI Block Diagram.  The LabVIEW Style Block Diagram Checklist tells us: “Avoid creating extremely large block diagrams. […] The size of the block diagram window can affect how readable LabVIEW code is to others.

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